Film Production and Crew Positions

Film Production, Crew Position, Film Production and Crew Positions

Film Production and Crew Positions

Producer

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The producer initiates, coordinates, supervises and controls matters such as raising funding, hiring key personnel, and arranging for distributors. The producer is involved throughout all phases of the filmmaking process from development to completion of a project.

Director

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The director is responsible for overseeing the creative aspects of a film, including controlling the content and flow of a film’s plot, directing the performances of actors, organizing and selecting the locations in which the film will be shot, and managing technical details such as the positioning of cameras, the use of lighting, and the timing and content of the film’s soundtrack. Though the director wields a great deal of power, he or she is ultimately subordinate to the film’s producer or producers.

First Assistant Director

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The first assistant director (1st AD) assists the producer and director. The ultimate aim of any 1st AD is to ensure the film comes in on schedule while maintaining a working environment in which the director, principal artists (actors) and crew can be focused on their work. He or she is in charge of overseeing the day-to-day management of the cast and crew scheduling, equipment, script, and set.

Second Assistant Director

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The second assistant director (2nd AD) is the chief assistant of the 1st AD and helps carry out those tasks delegated to the 1st AD. The 2nd AD may also direct background action and extras in addition to helping the 1st AD with scheduling, booking, etc. the 2nd AD is responsible for creating Call Sheets that let the crew know the schedule and important details about the shooting day.

Script Supervisor

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Also known as the “continuity person,” the script supervisor keeps track of what parts of the script have been filmed and makes notes of any deviations between what was actually filmed and what appeared in the script. He or she makes notes on every shot, also keeping track of props, blocking, and other details to ensure that continuity is maintained from shot to shot, and from scene to scene. The Script Supervisor’s notes are given to the Editor to expedite the editing process. The script supervisor works very closely with the director on set.

Executive Producer

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An executive producer (EP) enables the making of a commercial entertainment product. They may be concerned with management accounting and/or with associated legal issues (like copyrights or royalties). An EP generally contributes to the film’s budget and may or may not work on set.

Director of Photography (DOP) / Cinematographer

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The director of photography is the chief of the camera and lighting crew of the film. The DOP makes decisions on lighting and framing of scenes in conjunction with the film’s director. Typically, the director tells the DP how he or she wants a shot to look, and the DP then chooses the correct aperture, filter, and lighting to achieve the desired effect.
The term cinematographer is usually synonymous with “director of photographer”, though some professionals insist that it only apples when the director of photography and camera operator are the same person.

Camera Operator

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The camera operator uses the camera at the direction of the cinematographer, director of photography, or the film director to capture the scenes on film. Generally, a director of photography does not operate the camera, but sometimes these jobs may be combined.

First Assistant Camera

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The first assistant camera (1st AC) is responsible for keeping the camera in focus as it is shooting

Second Assistant Camera

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The second assistant camera (2nd AC) operates the clapboard at the beginning of each take and loads the raw stock into the camera, if there is no additional specifically designated film loader. Additionally, the 2nd AC oversees organization of camera equipment and transport of the equipment from one shooting location to another.

Gaffer

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The gaffer is the head of the electrical department, responsible for the design and execution of the lighting plan for a production. Sometimes the gaffer is credited as “Chief Lighting Technician”

Light Technician

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Lighting technicians are involved with setting up and controlling lighting equipment. Also referred to as electricians.

Electric Boy

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The electric boy is the chief assistant to the gaffer.

Key Grip

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The Key grip is the chief grip on a set, and is the head of the set operations department. The key grip works with the director of photography (DP) to help set up the set and to achieve the correct lighting and blocking.

Assistant Grip

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The best boy grip is the chief assistant to the key grip. They are also responsible for organizing the grip truck throughout the day.

Dolly Grip

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The grip in charge of operating the camera dolly is called the dolly grip. He/she places, levels, and moves the dolly track, then pushes and pulls the dolly and usually a camera operator and camera assistant as riders.

Location Manager

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Oversees the Locations Department and its staff, typically reporting directly to the Production Manager and/or Assistant Director (or even Director and/or Executive Producer). Location Manager is responsible for final clearing (or guaranteeing permission to use) a location for filming and must often assist Production/Finance Dept(s) in maintaining budget management regarding actual location/permit fees as well as labor costs to production for himself and the Locations Department .

Assistant Location Manager

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Assistant Location Manager works with the Location Manager and the various departments in arranging technical scouts for the essential staff (grips, electric, camera, etc.) to see options which the Location Manager has selected for filming. The Assistant Location Manager will be onset during the filming process to oversee the operation, whereas the Location Manager continues preproduction from elsewhere (generally an office) on the upcoming locations. (Note: On most location-based television shows, there will be two Assistant Location Managers that alternate episodes, allowing one to prep an upcoming episode while the other is on-set with the current one.)

Location Scout

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Does much of the actual research, footwork and photography to document location possibilities. Often the Location Manager will do some scouting himself, as well as the Assistant Location Manager.Location Assistant Hired by the Location Manager to be on-set before, during, and after the filming process. General responsibilities include arriving first at the location to allow the Set Dressers into the set for preparation; maintaining the cleanliness of the location areas during filming; fielding complaints from neighbors; and ultimately, at the end of the filming, making sure it seems as though the film crew was never there. There is generally one to three assistants on a shoot at any given time.

Location Assistant

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Location Assistant Hired by the Location Manager to be on-set before, during, and after the filming process. General responsibilities include arriving first at the location to allow the Set Dressers into the set for preparation; maintaining the cleanliness of the location areas during filming; fielding complaints from neighbors; and ultimately, at the end of the filming, making sure it seems as though the film crew was never there. There is generally one to three assistants on a shoot at any given time.

Sound Director

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In filmmaking, the Sound Director (Director of Autography) is the head of the sound department and the person responsible for planning the audiography and managing the audiographers of a film. The title is not used professionally in most of the world. The role of Sound Director derives from Bollywood-style filmmaking in India, where it is an established title credit. The DoA works to carry out the director’s vision, identifies the tasks necessary to realize this vision, budgets for those tasks and coordinates all the work from pre-production to post-production whilst keeping an eye on overall sound quality.

Sound Mixer

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The production sound mixer is head of the sound department on set, responsible for recording all sound during filming. This involves the choice and deployment of microphones, operation of a sound recording device, and frequently the mixing of audio signals in real time.

Boom Operator

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The boom operator is an assistant to the production sound mixer, responsible for microphone placement and movement during filming. The boom operator uses a boom pole, a long, special piece of equipment made from light aluminum or carbon fiber, that allows precise positioning of the microphone above or below the actors, just out of the camera’s frame. As well as the Placement of Radio Mic and other Microphones ‘Hidden’ on set

Utility Sound Technician

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The utility sound technician has a dynamic role in the sound department, most typically pulling cables, but often acting as an additional boom operator or mixer when required by complex filming circumstances. Not all films employ a utility sound technician, but the increasing complexities of location sound recording in modern film have made the job more prevalent. This role is sometimes credited as “cable man” or “python wrangler”.

Production Designer

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In film and television, a production designer or P.D is the person responsible for the overall look of a filmed event such as films, TV programs, video games, music videos or adverts. Production designers have one of the key creative roles in the creation of motion pictures and television. Working directly with the director and producer, they must select the settings and style to visually tell the story.

Art Director

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Art director is the title for a variety of similar job functions in theater, advertising, marketing, publishing, film and television, the Internet, and video games. Various artists may create or develop specific parts of an art piece or scene; but it is the charge of a sole art director to supervise and unify the vision. In particular, the art director is in charge of the overall visual appearance and how it communicates visually, stimulates moods, contrasts features, and psychologically appeals to a target audience.

Set Decorator

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A set decorator is in charge of the set dressing on a film set and television set which includes the furnishings, drapery, lighting fixtures, artwork and many of the other objects that will be seen in the film.

Makeup and Hair Artist

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A make-up artist (or ‘makeup artist’) is an artist whose medium is the human body, applying makeup and prosthetics for theatrical, television, film, fashion, magazines and other similar productions including all aspects of the modeling industry.
A hair artist is a person who cut or style hair in order to change or maintain a person’s image. This is achieved using a combination of hair coloring, haircutting, and hair texturing techniques.

Costume Designer

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A costume designer is a person who designs costumes for a film or stage production. The role of the costume designer is to create the characters and balance the scenes with texture and color, etc.

Props Master

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The property master is an artistic and organizational employee in a film, television or theatrical production who is responsible for purchasing, acquiring and/or manufacturing any props needed for a production. The property master also works with other members of the production managing the physical appearance of the stage or set, for example they might work with the script supervisor to maintain set continuity.

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